Antiarrhythmic drugs cause torsades pointes?

Asked By: Bud Windler
Date created: Fri, Jan 1, 2021 3:32 PM
Best answers
Drugs in a number of drug classes have been associated with torsade. Antiarrhythmic drugs associated with torsade include the following: Class IA - Quinidine, disopyramide, procainamide. Class III - Sotalol, amiodarone (rare), ibutilide, dofetilide, almokalant.
Answered By: Domingo Bartell
Date created: Sat, Jan 2, 2021 5:35 PM

Procainamide pharmacology, mechanism of action, torsades de pointes, class 1a antiarrhythmic

Procainamide pharmacology, mechanism of action, torsades de pointes, class 1a antiarrhythmic
The most likely electrophysiologic basis for torsade de pointes is the development of after-depolarizations facilitated by hypokalemia, bradycardia and lengthened QT intervals. Torsade de pointes can be produced by all antiarrhythmic agents that lengthen repolarization, although the precise incidence varies with different agents and is not quantitatively related to the degree of QT prolongation.
Answered By: Edgar Kunde
Date created: Sat, Jan 2, 2021 11:47 PM
Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia associated with not only antiarrhythmic drugs, but noncardiac drugs of many different classes. All these drugs prolong the QT interval by their blocking of the potassium channel I(Kr), and many are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4.
Answered By: Mavis Reilly
Date created: Tue, Jan 5, 2021 11:51 AM
Drugs in a number of drug classes have been associated with torsade. Antiarrhythmic drugs associated with torsade include the following: Class IA - Quinidine, disopyramide, procainamide Class III -...
Answered By: Makenna Ritchie
Date created: Fri, Jan 8, 2021 4:28 PM
Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia associated with not only antiarrhythmic drugs, but noncardiac drugs of many different classes. All these drugs prolong the QT interval by their blocking of the potassium channel IKr, and many are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4.
Answered By: Morton Jacobi
Date created: Sun, Jan 10, 2021 6:52 AM
Antiarrhythmic drugs, non-sedating antihistamines, macrolides antibiotics, antifungals, antimalarials, tricyclic antidepressants, neuroleptics, and prokinetics have all been implicated in causing QT prolongation and/or torsades de pointes
Answered By: Mozelle Beer
Date created: Tue, Jan 12, 2021 9:04 PM
Drugs in a number of drug classes have been associated with torsade. Antiarrhythmic drugs associated with torsade include the following: Class IA - Quinidine, disopyramide, procainamide. Class III - Sotalol, amiodarone (rare), ibutilide, dofetilide, almokalant. One may also ask, does amiodarone cause Torsades de Pointes?
Answered By: Katrine Sauer
Date created: Wed, Jan 13, 2021 10:12 AM
risk of torsades de pointes for sotalol and quinidine (Kinidine) appear higher than those associ-ated with amiodarone, although all three drugs cause marked QT pro-longation. The risks of torsades de pointes with noncardiac drugs are less well understood but syncope and cardiac arrest appear to be very unusual. For example, in epidemiological studies
Answered By: Erick Konopelski
Date created: Fri, Jan 15, 2021 12:39 PM
Evidence regarding which drugs cause torsades is extremely murky. In some cases it seems that drugs have been incorrectly maligned (e.g. azithromycin, olanzapine). One complicating factor is that there isn't a simple relationship between QT prolongation and torsades (some drugs such as amiodarone increase the QT without causing much torsades).
Answered By: Porter Quigley
Date created: Sun, Jan 17, 2021 9:55 AM
There is also a range of conditions and medications that cause or influence the development of torsades de pointes. These include: antiarrhythmic drugs, including quinidine, procainamide, and ...
Answered By: Al Mayert
Date created: Mon, Jan 18, 2021 9:31 PM
TdP episodes may be triggered by the use of certain drugs. These drugs include certain antibiotics and antipsychotics in addition to other medications.
Answered By: Jordan Schaefer
Date created: Tue, Jan 19, 2021 9:24 PM
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Torsades des pointes made simple

Torsades des pointes made simple
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