What affects drug efficacy?

Asked By: Liam Sporer
Date created: Wed, Dec 23, 2020 10:05 AM
Best answers
Efficacy vs Potency: As drug efficacy increases, so does the maximal biological response it can produce. Efficacy cannot be changed by increasing the dose beyond that which elicits a maximal response, since it is an inherent characteristic of the drug.
Answered By: Ellen Wiza
Date created: Thu, Dec 24, 2020 12:08 PM

Twelve years on enbrel - efficacy and side effects

Twelve years on enbrel - efficacy and side effects
For example, a drug may have high efficacy in lowering blood pressure but may have low effectiveness because it causes so many adverse effects that patients stop taking it. Effectiveness also may be lower than efficacy if clinicians inadvertently prescribe the drug inappropriately (eg, giving a fibrinolytic drug to a patient thought to have an ischemic stroke, but who had an unrecognized cerebral hemorrhage on CT scan).
Answered By: Kay Abernathy
Date created: Fri, Dec 25, 2020 1:03 PM
The following factors change the efficacy of a drug within a person’s system: 1. Age (often due to a decrease in GFR therefore a decrease in drug excretion) 2. Weight. 3. Condition of the patient and any previous medical illnesses or conditions. 4. Individual variation. 5. Idiosyncratic and allergic reactions
Answered By: Nestor Auer
Date created: Sun, Dec 27, 2020 11:19 AM
The primary factors that influence drug effect are the type of drug and the quantity used. Other factors include: Overhead transparency. time taken to consume the drug (10 minutes vs 10 hours) tolerance (e.g. regular cannabis smoker vs naïve smoker) gender, size and amount of muscle; other psycho-active drugs in the person's bloodstream (poly-drug use)
Answered By: Chaim Metz
Date created: Mon, Dec 28, 2020 9:16 AM
Obviously, a drug (or any medical treatment) should be used only when it will benefit a patient. Benefit takes into account both the drug's ability to produce the desired result (efficacy) and the type and likelihood of adverse effects (safety). Cost is commonly also balanced with benefit (see Economic Analyses in Clinical Decision Making).
Answered By: Melany Wiza
Date created: Wed, Dec 30, 2020 12:52 AM
Drug Efficacy. Drug efficacy may decline over the long term, or side effects become a major problem, and in such patients the remaining treatment options are invasive, such as surgical myectomy, dual-chamber pacing, or alcohol septal ablation. From: Drugs for the Heart (Seventh Edition), 2009. Download as PDF.
Answered By: Donato Cassin
Date created: Sat, Jan 2, 2021 3:23 AM
Early drug use may impede acquisition of critical thinking skills and hinder the learning of important cognitive strategies required for successful transition to adulthood. To better understand these relations, longitudinal latent-variable analyses were used to examine the effects of early adolescent drug use on early-late adolescent cognitive efficacy.
Answered By: Taylor Fritsch
Date created: Tue, Jan 5, 2021 7:53 AM
Maximal Efficacy Diuretics that act on one portion of the nephron may produce much greater excretion of fluid and electrolytes than diuretics that act elsewhere. In addition, the practical efficacy of a drug for achieving a therapeutic end point (eg, increased cardiac contractility) may be limited by the drug's propensity to cause a toxic effect (eg, fatal cardiac arrhythmia) even if the drug could otherwise produce a greater therapeutic effect.
Answered By: Anderson Gutkowski
Date created: Fri, Jan 8, 2021 12:29 PM
Once a drug is in your bloodstream it circulates through your body, being distributed to different organs and the brain. The drug affects chemicals and receptors within the brain, causing different effects depending on the type of drug.
Answered By: Annabell Keebler
Date created: Mon, Jan 11, 2021 10:07 PM
Efficacy is the maximum effect which can be expected from this drug (i.e. when this magnitude of effect is reached, increasing the dose will not produce a greater magnitude of effect). A drug, when occupying the receptor, may produce a complete response, or no response, or some partial response.
Answered By: Myrtice Haley
Date created: Tue, Jan 12, 2021 7:47 AM
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