What drugs affect coumadin levels?

Asked By: Robin Corkery
Date created: Fri, Apr 9, 2021 10:41 PM
Best answers

Common drugs that can interact with warfarin include:

  • Aspirin or aspirin-containing products.
  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or acetaminophen-containing products.
  • Antacids or laxatives.
  • Many antibiotics.
  • Antifungal medications, such as fluconazole (Diflucan)
  • Cold or allergy medicines.
Answered By: Eugene Metz
Date created: Sun, Apr 11, 2021 12:44 AM

Your diet and warfarin (coumadin)

Your diet and warfarin (coumadin)
Reduced Absorption of Warfarin: 0: 4: simvastatin: increased: Inhibition of Warfarin Metabolism: 1: 4: spironolactone: decreased: Hemoconcentration of Clotting Factors 5: 4: SSRIs: increased: Inhibition of Warfarin Metabolism: 4: 3: sucralfate: decreased: Reduced Absorption of Warfarin: 5: 3: Sulfa Antibiotics: increased: Inhibition of Warfarin Metabolism: 1: 3: Sulfinpyrazone: increased
Answered By: Darwin Lebsack
Date created: Mon, Apr 12, 2021 1:29 PM
Common drugs that can interact with warfarin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or acetaminophen-containing products
Answered By: Vallie Ratke
Date created: Tue, Apr 13, 2021 10:22 PM
Coumadin has a narrow therapeutic range (index), and its action may be affected by factors such as other drugs and dietary vitamin K. Therefore, anticoagulation must be carefully monitored during Coumadin therapy. Determine the INR daily after the administration of the initial dose until INR results stabilize in the therapeutic range.
Answered By: Monserrate Hudson
Date created: Thu, Apr 15, 2021 12:28 PM
Along with its needed effects, warfarin (the active ingredient contained in Coumadin) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking warfarin: Less common. Bleeding gums.
Answered By: Rashawn Jacobson
Date created: Fri, Apr 16, 2021 10:48 AM
Nutritional supplements including Boost® and Ensure® can also affect warfarin levels. Ask your healthcare provider about the suitability of taking these products. Alcohol increases the risk of major bleeding. Ask your healthcare provider if it's safe for you to drink alcoholic beverages while you are taking warfarin. Medications
Answered By: Loren Wolf
Date created: Fri, Apr 16, 2021 3:33 PM
Certain drinks can increase the effect of warfarin, leading to bleeding problems. Avoid or consume only small amounts of these drinks when taking warfarin: Cranberry juice; Alcohol; Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet and before starting any over-the-counter medications, vitamins or herbal supplements.
Answered By: Dariana Murazik
Date created: Sat, Apr 17, 2021 6:13 PM
Commonly used medications that may affect warfarin levels include non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, and some antibiotics. NSAIDs may be included in combination with other drugs in products such as cold and flu remedies. Some foods, especially those high in itamin K, may also affect warfarin levels.
Answered By: Johnnie Kilback
Date created: Sun, Apr 18, 2021 2:29 AM
Increased Risk of Bleeding due to Antiplatelet Effect. Feverfew ; Fish Oil/Omega 3 Fatty Acids ; Garlic ; Ginger ; Ginkgo ; Turmeric/Curcumin ; Warning in Coumadin Package Insert: Exercise caution when botanical (herbal) products are taken concomitantly with COUMADIN.
Answered By: Shyann Greenholt
Date created: Sun, Apr 18, 2021 8:14 AM
People taking the blood thinning medication warfarin may need to moderate vitamin K levels in their diets. Vitamin K may interfere with the effectiveness of warfarin.
Answered By: Brando Streich
Date created: Mon, Apr 19, 2021 6:59 AM
FAQ
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Stimulants including cocaine, meth, and ADHD medications are detectable for about 2 or 3 days. Benzodiazepines and MDMA generally flag a urine test for up to 4 days after last dose. Marijuana stays in the system a bit longer, with amounts being detectable for between 1 and 7 days after last use.
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To get high without using drugs, pick your favorite kind of exercise, like running, swimming, rowing, or biking, and try pushing yourself for a prolonged or extra difficult session to release endorphins, which make you feel naturally high. Alternatively, try breathing techniques to feel naturally high.
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However, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, some average times that drugs will continue to show up in a urine drug test include the following: [1] Heroin: 1-3 days. Cocaine: 2-3 days. Marijuana/THC: 1-7 days. Meth: 2-3 days. MDMA: 2-4 days.
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Drugs interfere with the way neurons send, receive, and process signals via neurotransmitters. Some drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, can activate neurons because their chemical structure mimics that of a natural neurotransmitter in the body. This allows the drugs to attach onto and activate the neurons.
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More than 70,000 Americans died from drug-involved overdose in 2019, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. drug overdose deaths involving any illicit or prescription opioid drug from 1999 to 2019.
📚
To get high without using drugs, pick your favorite kind of exercise, like running, swimming, rowing, or biking, and try pushing yourself for a prolonged or extra difficult session to release endorphins, which make you feel naturally high. Alternatively, try breathing techniques to feel naturally high.
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Warfarin: information about warfarin | warfarin interactions | warfarin side effects (2018) coumadin

Warfarin: information about warfarin | warfarin interactions | warfarin side effects (2018) coumadin
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