What happens to drug bust money?

Asked By: Raul Oberbrunner
Date created: Mon, Mar 29, 2021 6:20 PM
Best answers
After police and authorities have possession of cash or other seized property, there are two ways in which the seized assets become permanently theirs: first, if a prosecutor can prove that seized assets were connected to criminal activity in a courtroom, or second, if nobody tries to claim the seized assets.
Answered By: Kay Cronin
Date created: Tue, Mar 30, 2021 8:23 PM

Brother and sister arrested after police seize $24 million during drug bust

Brother and sister arrested after police seize $24 million during drug bust
Over the last 20 years or so, more and more departments are using money left over from drug busts, and the auctioning off of bust-related property, to purchase items that are outside of their...
Answered By: Euna Runolfsson
Date created: Wed, Mar 31, 2021 2:07 AM
Under federal law and according to the law in many states, law enforcement officials are permitted to keep drug money seized during raids to supplement their departments' revenues. When multiple departments work together on a raid, each is awarded a percentage of the money seized. This applies to the FBI as well as state, county and city police.
Answered By: Keon Homenick
Date created: Wed, Mar 31, 2021 11:16 AM
That decision is based on the suspect’s criminal history, mental stability and only given to suspects with drug offenses. Robertson explained that they choose to spend the awarded drug money to pay for better equipment and informants in hopes that they will accomplish their main goal of stopping the flow of drugs from coming into the community.
Answered By: Garrison Hayes
Date created: Fri, Apr 2, 2021 1:38 PM
After the drug money is seized and the required reports taken, an order of disposition is obtained from the Attorney General allowing the police department to retain a portion of the money for its budget with the remainder going into an asset fund held by the government. As of 2014, the amount of money obtained from drug busts has tripled recently ...
Answered By: Daron Towne
Date created: Sat, Apr 3, 2021 7:39 PM
If a gov’t agency like the FBI, DEA, or ATF makes the bust and the money is siezed by them, the money will be put in evidence for a time and then be divvyed up between the local district and the agency responsible for affecting the arrest and siezure.
Answered By: Enoch Kshlerin
Date created: Mon, Apr 5, 2021 12:26 PM
So, what actually happens to confiscated drug money in California, Florida, New York or Kansas? Under federal law and the according to the law in many states, law enforcement officials (police chiefs) are permitted to keep drug money seized during raids to supplement their department' revenues, such as buying computer equipment, gas masks, balloons, office supplies and so on.
Answered By: Christopher Carter
Date created: Wed, Apr 7, 2021 6:12 AM
When money is seized during a drug bust by the sheriff's department in my county, the money goes into a fund that is managed by the prosecutor's office and used for things like making undercover drug buys. When a house gets raided and drugs and cash are found, the cash is seized, but it is not immediately forfeited.
Answered By: Raegan Kozey
Date created: Wed, Apr 7, 2021 10:05 AM
So, if a drug dealer is driving a stolen vehicle when captured, officials won’t take the car for forfeiture. The items, after the suspect is convicted, are sold at auction with proceeds going to ...
Answered By: Kayla Kling
Date created: Thu, Apr 8, 2021 10:05 PM
DAYTON, Ohio (WRGT/WKEF)- Every year, millions of dollars of drug money, cars and assets are seized by local state and federal law enforcement agencies. FOX45/ABC22 is taking a deeper look into that process and where that money actually goes once it leaves the streets, “Let’s say our undercover detective goes in to a house, they seize bank accounts, two cars in the garage.
Answered By: Adan Fritsch
Date created: Sat, Apr 10, 2021 10:39 AM
The cash, as well as money from seized assets, are deposited into an asset forfeiture fund at the Department of Justice or the Department of Treasury, depending on the agency making the bust. The...
Answered By: Jarod Schultz
Date created: Sun, Apr 11, 2021 10:52 AM
FAQ
📚
We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.
📚
We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.
📚
Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include IBM Watson Micromedex (updated 1 July 2021), Cerner Multum™ (updated 1 July 2021), ASHP (updated 30 June ...
📚
Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences. Brain changes that occur over time with drug use challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs.
📚
More than 70,000 Americans died from drug-involved overdose in 2019, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. drug overdose deaths involving any illicit or prescription opioid drug from 1999 to 2019.

$205 million dollars in drug money seized in mexico

$205 million dollars in drug money seized in mexico
58 similar questions

10 biggest busts by police ever

10 biggest busts by police ever

Seized drug money invested back into community

Seized drug money invested back into community

Massive cash seizure still under investigation

Massive cash seizure still under investigation

Drug dealers anonymous -what i learned and why i would do it again

Drug dealers anonymous -what i learned and why i would do it again

Police seizing assets, keeping the cash

Police seizing assets, keeping the cash

Banks, cartels and money laundering

Banks, cartels and money laundering

Drug deal gone bad

Drug deal gone bad