What has the war on drugs caused?

Asked By: Crystal Kassulke
Date created: Thu, Dec 10, 2020 5:34 AM
Best answers
In 1994, the New England Journal of Medicine reported that the "War on Drugs" resulted in the incarceration of one million Americans each year. In 2008, the Washington Post reported that of 1.5 million Americans arrested each year for drug offenses, half a million would be incarcerated.
Answered By: Jenifer Cole
Date created: Fri, Dec 11, 2020 7:37 AM

The war on drugs has failed

The war on drugs has failed
Realities of the "war on drugs" have dragged the Mexican government into adopting increasingly punitive programs that have rendered drug manufacture and smuggling more appealing. Needed changes in Mexico's drug control policies are discussed that focus on the dynamics of the international drug market and U.S. drug control policies. 75 references, 174 notes, 5 tables, 10 figures, and 3 maps
Answered By: Talia Rohan
Date created: Sat, Dec 12, 2020 1:32 AM
Nixon created the DEA in 1972. The beginnings of America’s War on Drugs were in the 1870s. The drug war actually started much earlier, and the outlawing of opium, cocaine, and marijuana all have links to both racism and xenophobia.
Answered By: Delphia Lueilwitz
Date created: Sat, Dec 12, 2020 9:52 AM
The War on Drugs is a phrase used to refer to a government-led initiative that aims to stop illegal drug use, distribution and trade by dramatically increasing prison sentences for both drug ...
Answered By: Kennedi Bosco
Date created: Mon, Dec 14, 2020 7:47 AM
The war on drugs is a global campaign, led by the U.S. federal government, of drug prohibition, military aid, and military intervention, with the aim of reducing the illegal drug trade in the United States. The initiative includes a set of drug policies that are intended to discourage the production, distribution, and consumption of psychoactive drugs that the participating governments and the ...
Answered By: Ayla Nikolaus
Date created: Mon, Dec 14, 2020 9:21 PM
The War on Drugs is a well-known campaign initiated by the United States government. It aimed to fight illegal drug use by drastically increasing the penalties, enforcement, and imprisonment for illicit activities revolving around drug distribution and consumption.
Answered By: Morgan Larson
Date created: Fri, Dec 18, 2020 4:33 AM
The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for.
Answered By: Aracely McLaughlin
Date created: Fri, Dec 18, 2020 1:38 PM
Your editorial correctly illustrated the consequences of the war on drugs in some areas, such as corruption, violence and mass incarceration of certain populations, among others.
Answered By: Darryl Cummerata
Date created: Sun, Dec 20, 2020 11:00 AM
Richard M. Nixon, the Republican presidential candidate from California, played on these fears by inventing a “war on drugs,” which targeted war demonstrators and African Americans. A shrewd politician, Nixon used his war on drugs as part of his campaign even though the identified “problem” – drugs – and the articulated strategy in response were based on questionable data.
Answered By: Josephine Walter
Date created: Wed, Dec 23, 2020 9:37 AM
The US started the war as a way to claim power over Americans, politics, and push the racial divide. The War on Drugs has caused our law enforcement to become more militarized which could be responsible for the rise in police brutality. Support for the military is associated with the Republican party which pushes a political agenda.
Answered By: Salvador Gutkowski
Date created: Fri, Dec 25, 2020 10:59 AM
The war on drugs is really a war on people. It is hard to imagine an issue that has caused so much damage to so many people on so many fronts. Thankfully momentum is building in the this country and abroad toward a more rational drug policy based on science, compassion, health and human rights.
Answered By: Tyree Hand
Date created: Sun, Dec 27, 2020 4:26 PM
FAQ
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Stimulants including cocaine, meth, and ADHD medications are detectable for about 2 or 3 days. Benzodiazepines and MDMA generally flag a urine test for up to 4 days after last dose. Marijuana stays in the system a bit longer, with amounts being detectable for between 1 and 7 days after last use.
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More than 70,000 Americans died from drug-involved overdose in 2019, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids. The figure above is a bar and line graph showing the total number of U.S. drug overdose deaths involving any illicit or prescription opioid drug from 1999 to 2019.
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To get high without using drugs, pick your favorite kind of exercise, like running, swimming, rowing, or biking, and try pushing yourself for a prolonged or extra difficult session to release endorphins, which make you feel naturally high. Alternatively, try breathing techniques to feel naturally high.
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However, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, some average times that drugs will continue to show up in a urine drug test include the following: [1] Heroin: 1-3 days. Cocaine: 2-3 days. Marijuana/THC: 1-7 days. Meth: 2-3 days. MDMA: 2-4 days.
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Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include IBM Watson Micromedex (updated 1 July 2021), Cerner Multum™ (updated 1 July 2021), ASHP (updated 30 June ...
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