Which classes antiarrythmic action potention drugs?

Asked By: Damon Kessler
Date created: Sun, May 23, 2021 4:31 PM
Best answers

The five main classes in the Vaughan Williams classification of antiarrhythmic agents are:

  • Class I agents interfere with the sodium (Na+) channel.
  • Class II agents are anti-sympathetic nervous system agents…
  • Class III agents affect potassium (K+) efflux.
  • Class IV agents affect calcium channels and the AV node.
Answered By: Mckenna Hintz
Date created: Mon, May 24, 2021 6:34 PM

Antiarrhythmic drugs/ agents | chapter 1: cardiac action potential (made easy)

Antiarrhythmic drugs/ agents | chapter 1: cardiac action potential (made easy)
landmark classification of antiarrhythmic drugs based on the actions of these drugs on cardiac action poten-tial (AP) components and their relationship to arrhyth-mias.1,2 This classification proved, and remains, central to clinical management. Thus, Class I drugs produce moderate (Ia), weak (Ib), or marked (Ic) Na+ channel
Answered By: Pete Keeling
Date created: Tue, May 25, 2021 4:24 PM
Classes of antiarrhythmic drugs [1] [2] Class Drug group Mechanism of action Examples Use Adverse effects; Class IA antiarrhythmics. Fast sodium channel blockers; Reduce or even block conduction (negative dromotropy), particularly in depolarized tissue (e.g., during tachycardia) State-dependent: the faster the heart rate (e.g., tachycardia ...
Answered By: Onie Zemlak
Date created: Wed, May 26, 2021 6:57 PM
The action potential is then passed to the AV node, after which it gets passed to the bundle of His, and finally to the Purkinje fibers. Classes and their mechanisms of action. Based on their different effects on heart cells, antiarrhythmic drugs are divided in to 5 classes by Vaughan-Williams classification. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs
Answered By: Tate Wilkinson
Date created: Thu, May 27, 2021 5:35 PM
Antiarrhythmic drugs comprise many different drug classes and have several different mechanisms of action. Furthermore, some classes and even some specific drugs within a class are effective with only certain types of arrhythmias. Therefore, attempts have been made to classify the different antiarrhythmic drugs so by mechanism.
Answered By: Geraldine Koch
Date created: Fri, May 28, 2021 2:55 PM
Classes of drugs used in the treatment of arrhythmias are given below. Clicking on the drug class will link you to the page describing the pharmacology of that drug class and specific drugs. Please note that many of the drugs comprising the first five listed classes have considerable overlap in their pharmacologic properties.
Answered By: Wilhelm Miller
Date created: Sat, May 29, 2021 6:48 AM
Phase 0 is the “climb” phase in which the voltage across the cell membrane becomes more positive (depolarizes) due to the influx of calcium ions. Phase 3 is the “plummet” phase in which the voltage across the cell membrane becomes more negative (repolarizes) due to the efflux of potassium ions. Phase 4 occurs when the voltage across the cell membrane slowly becomes more positive until ...
Answered By: Ardella O'Reilly
Date created: Sat, May 29, 2021 10:45 AM
Antiarrhythmic agents, also known as cardiac dysrhythmia medications, are a group of pharmaceuticals that are used to suppress abnormal rhythms of the heart (cardiac arrhythmias), such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation.. Many attempts have been made to classify antiarrhythmic agents. The problem arises from the fact that many of the ...
Answered By: Zane Ziemann
Date created: Sun, May 30, 2021 9:57 AM
It is recognized that class I antiarrhythmic drugs with anticholinergic activity cause untoward effects such as dry mouth, constipation, and urinary retention. 51 Since these class III antiarrhythmic drugs also interacted with cardiac muscarinic receptors in this study, one may expect that these drugs may exert such extracardiac side effects.
Answered By: Keeley Trantow
Date created: Sun, May 30, 2021 8:54 PM
Many antiarrhythmic drugs alter the ERP, thereby altering cellular excitability. For example, drugs that block potassium channels (e.g., amiodarone, a Class III antiarrhythmic) delay phase 3 repolarization and increases the ERP. Drugs that increase the ERP can be particularly effective in abolishing reentry currents that lead to tachyarrhythmias.
Answered By: Keely Langworth
Date created: Sun, May 30, 2021 9:23 PM
These drugs have a lower potention for abuse that those in schedules I, II, III, and IV: Lomotil, Dimetane, Expectorant DC, Robitussin DAC
Answered By: Marisa Morar
Date created: Mon, May 31, 2021 3:24 AM
FAQ
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Antiarrhythmic drugs/ agents | chapter 3: classification and mechanism of action (made easy)

Antiarrhythmic drugs/ agents | chapter 3: classification and mechanism of action (made easy)
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